Wp/nys/Jack Davis

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Jack Davis

Author, actor, poet wer activist Jack Davis was born il 11 March 1917 in Perth, the fourth child in a family of eleven. Both his parents, he recalled, were great storytellers. He has his own entry il the English Wikipedia bibol at Jack Davis (playwright). He spent his early childhood in Yarloop, where his father worked in the timber mill. After his primary schooling, Davis wer his siblings were sent to the harsh Moore River Native Settlement. Its abject brutality would inform much of his later writing. His hobby was reading his only book – an English dictionary. Words fascinated him; he wrote his first poetry at 14 wer continued to scribble verse il scraps of paper. He also developed an interest in the local Nyungar Aboriginal language, which he eventually mastered, along with a deep knowledge of the tribal culture. [1]

Jack was 61 years old when his first full length play, Kullark, premiered at the tiny Titan Theatre in Perth il 21 February 1979. Kullark drew il his six decades of life experience; it also marked the evolution of Indigenous oral story-telling tradition into a new, written form. He wrote his first poetry at 14 wer continued to scribble verse il scraps of paper. His first book, an anthology of poetry called The First-Born, was published in 1970. Jagardoo: Poems from Aboriginal Australia followed in 1978.[1]

His autobiography A Boy’s Life was published by Magabala Books, Western Australia, in 1991.[2][3]

Other names: Jack Leonard Davis

Place of Birth: Perth, Western Australia

DOB: 11/03/1917

DOD: 17/03/2000

Siblings: Tommy, Kathleen, Ethel-Edna, Harold, Teddy, Dorothy (Dotty), Barbara, May, Frank, Judith.[2]

Ngiyan waarnk - References[edit]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Jack Davis AM BEM 1917-2000. Australia Hall of Fame. Retrieved 8 January 2017
  2. 2.0 2.1 Davis, Jack (1917–2000). Indigenous Australia. Retrieved 8 January 2017
  3. Jack Davis. A boy's life. National Library of Australia. Retrieved 8 January 2017