Wt/sco/sic

From Wikimedia Incubator
< Wt‎ | scoWt > sco > sic
Jump to: navigation, search

English[edit]

Template:Wt/sco/Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: sĭk, IPA([[wikipedia:Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/language_utilities at line 7: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'. phonology|key]]): /sɪk/, X-SAMPA: /sIk/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: [[Rhymes:Wt/sco/Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/language_utilities at line 7: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'.:-ɪk|-ɪk]]
  • Homophone: sick

Etymology 1[edit]

From Script error: No such module "Wt/sco/etymology language". Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist..

Latin word meaning "thus," "so," "as such," or "in such a manner." It is used when writing quoted material to indicate that an incorrect or unusual spelling, phrase, punctuation or meaning in the quote has been reproduced verbatim from the original and is not a transcription error (i.e. it appeared thus in the original). It is normally placed within the quoted material, in square brackets and often italicized—[sic]. Alternatively it can appear after the quote in parentheses (round brackets)—(sic).[1] Where the quoted material is a known error, and the correct word or phrase is known, it may be included, preceded by recte, Latin for "rightly"; this is common in palaeography.

Adverb[edit]

Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/headword at line 1: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'.

  1. thus; thus written
Usage notes[edit]

The word sic may be used in brackets to show that an uncommon or archaic usage is reported faithfully: for instance, quoting the U.S. Constitution:

The House of Representatives shall chuse [sic] their Speaker ...

It may also be used to highlight a perceived error, sometimes for the purpose of ridicule, as in this example from The Times:

Warehouse has been around for 30 years and has 263 stores, suggesting a large fan base. The chain sums up its appeal thus: "styley [sic], confident, sexy, glamorous, edgy, clean and individual, with it's [sic] finger on the fashion pulse."[2]

On occasion, sic has been misidentified as an abbreviation for "said in context," "spelled in context," "said in copy," "spelling is correct," "spelled incorrectly" and other phrases.[3] These are all backronyms from sic.

Related terms[edit]
  • sic passim (Used to indicate that the preceding word, phrase, or term is used in the same manner (or form) throughout the remainder of a text.)
  • sic transit gloria mundi (Fame is temporary.)
  • sic semper tyrannis (Thus always to tyrants, shouted by John Wilkes Booth after assassinating Abraham Lincoln.)
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/headword at line 1: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'. (third-person singular simple present sic, present participle c, simple past and past participle ing)

  1. To mark with a bracketed sic.[4]
    E. Belfort Bax wrote "... the modern reviewer's taste is not really shocked by half the things he sics or otherwise castigates."[4][5]

Etymology 2[edit]

Variant of Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist..

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/headword at line 1: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'. (third-person singular simple present sic, present participle c, simple past and past participle ing)

  1. Template:Wt/sco/Transitive To incite an attack by, especially a dog or dogs.
    He sicced his dog on me!
  2. Template:Wt/sco/Transitive To set upon; to chase; to attack.
    Sic 'em, Mitzi.
Usage notes[edit]
  • The sense of "set upon" is most commonly used as an imperative, in a command to an animal.
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. 1993, {{{author}}}, The Columbia Guide to Standard American English:
    {{{text}}}
    The particular entry is available in the online preview, via search.
  2. Ashworth, Anne, "Chain reaction: Warehouse", The Times, 2006-06-21. Retrieved on 2007-01-06.
  3. e.g. "Abbreviations.com", URL accessed on 2010-01-27., "Thefreedictionary.com", URL accessed on 2010-01-27.
  4. 4.0 4.1 "sic, adv. (and n.)" Oxford English Dictionary, Second Edition 1989. Oxford University Press.
  5. E. Belfort Bax. On Some Forms of Modern Cant. Commonweal: 7 May 1887. Marxists’ Internet Archive: 14 Jan. 2006

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Script error: No such module "Wt/sco/etymology language". Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist..

Adverb[edit]

Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/headword at line 1: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'.

  1. Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.

Latin[edit]

Adverb[edit]

Lua error in Module:Wt/sco/headword at line 1: data for mw.loadData contains unsupported data type 'function'.

  1. thus, so, or just like that

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • French: Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.
  • Italian: Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.
  • Portuguese: Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.
  • Romanian: Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.
  • Spanish: Script error: The function "template_l_term" does not exist.

Scots[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

Wt/sco/sic (comparative {{{1}}}, superlative {{{2}}})

  1. such

Pronoun[edit]

Wt/sco/sic

  1. such